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HebrewHebr

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30

Sources for this script

Sources are references to books, web pages, articles and other materials. Scroll down to see the source on this page, or click on the title to see full details.

Title Type
Adaptations of Hebrew Script book section
ALA-LC Romanization Tables - Library of Congress web page
Aleph=X, or contemporary Hebrew bad type conference presentation
An Annotated Bibliography of Hebrew Typesetting academic paper
Concise Compendium of the World's Languages book
Developing OpenType Fonts for Hebrew Script - Microsoft Typography web page
Hebrew - Omniglot web page
Hebrew book section
Hebrew Alphabet - Judaism 101 web page
Hebrew Alphabet - Wikipedia web page
Hebrew Cantillation Marks And Their Encoding - Leibniz-Rechenzentrum web page
Hebrew character picker - Ishida apps web page
Hebrew Issues - Jonathan (Jony) Rosenne's Hebrew Page web page
Hebrew Type Designs - Typophile web page
Language-Specific Style Guides from Microsoft web page
Meteg and Siluq in the BHS web page
Non-Latin Font: Hebrew - MonotypeFonts web page
Oketz web page
Puncta in the BHS web page
Reversed Nun in the BHS web page
Script features by language - rishida.net web page
Sorting all RTL scripts together academic paper
The Cantillation on the Ten Commandments - Typophile - The Decalogue web page
The Jewish Scripts book section
The Mechanics of the Ancient Hebrew Alphabet - Ancient Hebrew Research Center web page
Unicode Character Pickers web page
Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Eastern Yiddish - Unicode - UDHR web page
Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Hebrew - Unicode - UDHR web page
Use of Dagesh - Leibniz-Rechenzentrum web page
Yiddish book section
30
  • AuthorBenjamin Hary
    BookThe World's Writing Systems
    EditorPeter T. Daniels, William Bright
    PublisherOxford University Press
    LocationOxford, UK
    Year1996
    ISBN/ISSN0-19-507993-0
    Pages727-734
  • These Library of Congress tables are used by librarians in cataloging data from a non-Roman script into the Latin script.

    Site nameLibrary of Congress
    LinkALA-LC Romanization Tables
    Abstract

    The definitive transliteration guide for anyone who transliterates words, names, titles, or text from a non-Roman script into the Roman script. Provides the most up to date ALA-LC transliteration schemes for even obscure scripts. Includes 61 transliteration tables covering more than 145 languages and dialects written in non-Roman scripts. The first single source for accurate, up to date LC romanization practice. Supersedes all ALA-LC romanization tables previously issued. Organized for practical use.

  • This article is taken from a talk about Hebrew Latinized type given at the 2004 Friends of St Bride Conference. It is an attempt to demonstrate why Latinized Hebrew type is problematic, both from cultural and functional aspects. The article provides an overview of the Hebrew script, and a comparison of Hebrew and Latin writing, followed by a discussion of the influence of Latin on Hebrew. This is attributed in part to globalization, and, in particular, what the author refers to as Israel's process of Americanization.

    Typepresentation
    PresenterAdi Stern
    ConferenceFriends of St Bride Conference
    Date2004-10-18
    LinkAleph=X, or contemporary Hebrew bad type
  • Sivan Toledo has prepared an annotated bibliography of resources on Hebrew typesetting. The bibliography focuses on how Hebrew is printed, not on what is printed, nor where or by whom. It covers typesetting in the Hebrew, Yiddish and Ladino languages since the 19th century. The link below starts a download of the document in PDF format.

    Typepaper
    AuthorSivan Toledo
    InstitutionTel Aviv University
    Date2001-09-23
    LinkAn Annotated Bibliography of Hebrew Typesetting
  • This book contains short entries on about a hundred languages. Articles are ordered alphabetically, and each has a standard structure for ease of reference, including:

    • General Historical and Sociolinguistic Introduction
    • Writing System
    • Sound System
    • Grammatical System
    • Sample scan from a publication

    The book has an Appendix of Scripts. Each script entry is generally a chart of the characters as well as a transliteration. Most of the script entries have a small amount of explanatory text.

    AuthorGeorge L. Campbell
    PublisherRoutledge
    LocationLondon and New York,
    YearFirst published 1995, Reprinted 1999.
    ISBN/ISSN0-415-16049-9 [Second edition published 2011: 0-415-47841-3]
  • This document presents information that will help font developers create or support OpenType fonts for all Hebrew script languages covered by the Unicode Standard.

    Site nameMicrosoft Typography
    DateFebruary 2002, accessed 27 August 2015
    Linkhttp://www.microsoft.com/typography/OpenTypeDev/hebrew/intro.htm
  • AuthorJulie D. Allen et al. (eds.)
    BookThe Unicode Standard version 5.2
    EditorJulie D. Allen et al.
    PublisherAddison-Wesley
    LocationUpper Saddle River, NJ
    Year2009
    Pages234-238
    LinkThe Unicode Standard Chapter 8
  • AuthorSimon Ager
    Site nameOmniglot
    DateAccessed 8 July 2010
    LinkHebrew
  • AuthorTracey R Rich
    Site nameJudaism 101
    DateAccessed 9 June 2010
    LinkHebrew Alphabet
  • Site nameWikipedia
    DateAccessed 8 July 2010
    LinkHebrew Alphabet
  • This page provides a detailed discussion of the accents used in Biblical Hebrew. The page is provided by the Leibniz-Rechenzentrum, the computer centre for Munich's universities and for the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities.

    AuthorHelmut Richter
    Site nameLeibniz-Rechenzentrum
    Date2004-08-25
    LinkHebrew Cantillation Marks And Their Encoding
  • Pickers allow you to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters arranged in a way that aids their identification. The phrase appears at the bottom of the screen and you can easily cut and paste the result into your own document. They're written in XHTML with a small amount of JavaScript.

    This picker includes all the characters in the Unicode Hebrew block as of Unicode 5.2.

    AuthorRichard Ishida
    Site nameIshida apps
    LinkHebrew character picker
  • This is a technical discussion related to Unicode encoding of Hebrew, focusing on details that are not often covered in descriptions of the Hebrew script.

    AuthorJonathan (Jony) Rosenne
    Site nameJonathan (Jony) Rosenne's Hebrew Page
    DateAccessed 2011-08-24
    LinkHebrew Issues
  • This is a Typophile thread based on Mr. Frank Raphael's book on Hebrew type, the title of which is not given. The book, published first in German and subsequently in Hebrew, provides an overview of the history of Hebrew type design, illustrated with many examples of different styles. The Typophile thread discusses the book in detail, and builds on the book's content with modern examples of Hebrew type styles. The thread also devotes some time to the use of the meteg (unified in Unicode with siluq) vocalization/cantillation mark.

    Site nameTypophile
    Date2008-09-17
    LinkTypophile Forum - Hebrew Type Designs
  • Microsoft Style Guides are collections of rules that define language and style conventions for specific languages. These rules usually include general localization guidelines, information on language style and usage in technical publications, and information on market-specific data formats.

    Dateaccessed 2014-07-03
    LinkMicrosoft Style Guides
  • The problem of proper placement of the meteg character, and a method for dealing with this.

    AuthorJoan Wardell and Christopher Samuel
    Date2003-09-30
    LinkMeteg and Siluq in the BHS
  • This is a brief description of the ancient and modern Hebrew scripts, from the Monotype Font Foundry's Non-Latin Library. The page contains information about the script, font samples, and the glyph repertoire.

    Site nameMonotypeFonts
    DateAccessed 2011-08-24
    LinkNon-Latin Font: Hebrew
  • Oketz is a site / blog created by Meir Sadan, containing fonts, articles, videos and helpful links for those interested in Hebrew typography. Please note: the site is in Hebrew.

    AuthorMeir Sadan
    LinkOketz
  • Puncta extraordinaria are round or diamond-shaped marks found in some biblical Hebrew texts. They can appear above or below a consonant. This article describes the correct way to access these characters in the Ezra SIL fonts, and how to encode them correctly in other fonts.

    AuthorJoan Wardell and Christopher Samuel
    Date2003-09-30
    LinkPuncta in the BHS
  • Reversed Nun (also called "inverted nun", "nun hafukha" or "nun menuzerret") is a character found in Biblical Hebrew texts. It may be dotted or undotted. This article describes how to access the Reversed Nun in the Ezra SIL fonts.

    AuthorJoan Wardell, Peter Constable and Christopher Samuel
    Date2003-11-05
    LinkReversed Nun in the BHS
  • Richard Ishida has created a chart to show which features (for example, combining characters, ligatures, case, baseline etc.) apply to a number of writing systems. The characteristics described are based on the exemplar character lists in the CLDR. The chart is intended to give a basic idea of which writing systems require what types of feature support.

    AuthorRichard Ishida
    Site namerishida.net
    Date2010-08-30
    LinkScript features by language
  • Unicode document.

    Typepaper
    AuthorRoozbeh Pournader
    InstitutionUnicode Technical Committee
    Date2012-11-03
    LinkL2/12-377
  • This blog entry by David Hamuel discusses the two types of cantillation marks, upper cantillation marks (ta’am elyon טעם עליון) and lower cantillation marks (ta’am tachton טעם תחתון), used for punctuating the Ten Commandments.

    AuthorDavid Hamuel
    Site nameTypophile - The Decalogue
    Date2008-03-17
    LinkThe Cantillation on the Ten Commandments
  • AuthorRichard L Goerwitz
    BookThe World's Writing Systems
    EditorPeter T. Daniels, William Bright
    PublisherOxford University Press
    LocationOxford, UK
    Year1996
    ISBN/ISSN0-19-507993-0
    Pages487-498
  • This page provides an overview of the Ancient Hebrew alphabet, including the way it worked, its history and development, and an animation demonstrating the evolution of certain letterforms from Ancient Hebrew to Modern Hebrew and Latin.

    Site nameAncient Hebrew Research Center
    DateAccessed 2011-08-24
    LinkThe Mechanics of the Ancient Hebrew Alphabet
  • A character picker is a tool that allows users to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters which have been arranged in a way that aids their identification. This is one such tool, which covers a number of scripts including Arabic, Bengali, Devanagari, Gurmukhi, Hebrew, Lao, Tamil, and Thai, amongst others. The user selects the required script from a panel on the right, and the characters for that script are presented to them, from which they can select the characters they need. As characters are selected, the phrase appears at the bottom of the screen and can be cut and pasted into other documents.
    Character pickers are likely to be most useful to those who don't know a script well enough to use the native keyboard. The arrangement of characters also makes it much more useable than a regular character map utility.

    AuthorRichard Ishida
    DateAccessed 2011-12-21
    LinkUnicode Character Pickers
  • The full text of the UDHR written in Eastern Yiddish, taken from the  Unicode UDHR site. Further information on UDHR materials for Eastern Yiddish may be available from the  United Nations Human Rights website.

  • The full text of the UDHR written in Hebrew, taken from the  Unicode UDHR site. Further information on UDHR materials for Hebrew may be available from the  United Nations Human Rights website.

  • This plain text file has no images or Hebrew-script text, but it does provide some useful discussion of dagesh, mappiq and shureq. It is provided by the Leibniz-Rechenzentrum, the computer centre for Munich's universities and for the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities.

    Site nameLeibniz-Rechenzentrum
    DateAccessed 2011-08-24
    LinkUse of Dagesh
  • AuthorHoward I Aronson
    BookThe World's Writing Systems
    EditorPeter T. Daniels, William Bright
    PublisherOxford University Press
    LocationOxford, UK
    Year1996
    ISBN/ISSN0-19-507993-0
    Pages735-741

Copyright © 2017 SIL International and released under the  Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license (CC-BY-SA) unless noted otherwise. Language data includes information from the  Ethnologue. Script information partially from the  ISO 15924 Registration Authority. Some character data from  The Unicode Standard Character Database and locale data from the  Common Locale Data Repository. Used by permission.