ScriptSource

Script

TibetanTibt

Subject areas for this script

This subject area includes both general entries that discuss the range of resources available and listings of specific resources (books, sites, journal articles, etc.).

0

Entries in this subject area

Entries can contain text, graphics, media, files and software.

There are no entries yet for this subject - please add some using the Add to ScriptSource button.

0

Blog posts in this subject area

These are posts from the blogs on this site; the full blogs can be accessed under the Topics link.

There are no blog posts for this subject.

0

Discussions in this subject area

Discussions include ideas, opinions or questions that invite comments from other ScriptSource users.

There are no discussions for this subject.

24

Sources for this script

Sources are references to books, web pages, articles and other materials. Scroll down to see the source on this page, or click on the title to see full details.

Title Type
ALA-LC Romanization Tables - Library of Congress web page
ArabicShaping suggestion e-mail academic paper
Brahmi Descended Scripts - reocities web page
Concise Compendium of the World's Languages book
Creating and supporting OpenType fonts for the Universal Shaping Engine - Microsoft Typography web page
Creating and Supporting OpenType Fonts for Tibetan Script - Microsoft Typography web page
Dzongkha Tools for Unicode - Dzongkha Development Commission web page
Elements of the Tibetan Writing System - Chris Fynn web page
Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan book
How to write the Tibetan script - Chris Fynn web page
Jomolhari font - Chris Fynn web page
Learn Tibetan - reocities web page
Numbers that Don't Add Up : Tibetan Half Digits - BabelStone web page
Script & Font Support in Windows - Microsoft Go Global Developer Center web page
Script features by language - Dzongkha written with the Tibetan script - rishida.net web page
Script features by language - Tibetan written with the Tibetan script - rishida.net web page
Script selection for Tibetan-related languages in multiscriptal environments journal article
The Tibetan Abugida book section
Tibetan and Bhutanese Marks and Signs inclusion into Tibetan Unicode 3.0 academic paper
Tibetan character notes - rishida.net web page
Tibetan character picker - Ishida apps web page
Tibetan script notes - rishida.net web page
Unicode Character Pickers web page
Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Tibetan - Unicode - UDHR web page
24
  • These Library of Congress tables are used by librarians in cataloging data from a non-Roman script into the Latin script.

    Site nameLibrary of Congress
    LinkALA-LC Romanization Tables
    Abstract

    The definitive transliteration guide for anyone who transliterates words, names, titles, or text from a non-Roman script into the Roman script. Provides the most up to date ALA-LC transliteration schemes for even obscure scripts. Includes 61 transliteration tables covering more than 145 languages and dialects written in non-Roman scripts. The first single source for accurate, up to date LC romanization practice. Supersedes all ALA-LC romanization tables previously issued. Organized for practical use.

  • Unicode document.

    Typepaper
    AuthorMark Davis
    InstitutionUnicode Technical Committee
    Date2004-11-18
    LinkL2/04-419
  • This page shows the modern descendants of the ancient Brahmi script, in chart form, so that each character can be compared across scripts. The page includes scripts from North and South India, South-East Asia, Indonesia, and the Philippines.

    Site namereocities
    DateAccessed 2011-08-19
    LinkBrahmi Descended Scripts
  • This book contains short entries on about a hundred languages. Articles are ordered alphabetically, and each has a standard structure for ease of reference, including:

    • General Historical and Sociolinguistic Introduction
    • Writing System
    • Sound System
    • Grammatical System
    • Sample scan from a publication

    The book has an Appendix of Scripts. Each script entry is generally a chart of the characters as well as a transliteration. Most of the script entries have a small amount of explanatory text.

    AuthorGeorge L. Campbell
    PublisherRoutledge
    LocationLondon and New York,
    YearFirst published 1995, Reprinted 1999.
    ISBN/ISSN0-415-16049-9 [Second edition published 2011: 0-415-47841-3]
  • This document presents information that will help font developers in creating OpenType fonts for complex scripts included in the Unicode Standard 7.0., but not otherwise supported by a dedicated shaping engine.

    Site nameMicrosoft Typography
    DateFebruary 2015, accessed 27 August 2015
    LinkCreating and supporting OpenType fonts for the Universal Shaping Engine
  • This document presents information that will assist font developers in creating fonts for the Tibetan scripts covered by the Unicode Standard 6.0. The Tibetan script is used for writing Tibetan in several countries and regions throughout the Himalayas. It is also used to write Balti, Bumthangkha, Khengkha, and oher languages. It has also been used to transliterate Sanskrit and Chinese. The Tibetan writing system was based on a North Indian form of the Brahmi script and is said to have been developed to bring Buddhism from India to Tibet. Two distinctive styles have emerged: a formal style used for books and inscriptions (called dbu can ‘with a head’) and a cursive or calligraphic style (dbu med ‘acephalous’) commonly used in hand-written contexts. Tibetan script is a parent script of Phags-pa, Limbu, and Lepcha, which have separate encodings and shaping requirements.

    Site nameMicrosoft Typography
    DateAccessed 27 August 2015
    LinkCreating and Supporting OpenType Fonts for Tibetan Script
  • Free Dzongkha and Tibetan keyboard, Tibetan script fonts and computing instructions developed by the DDC, Thimphu, Bhutan

    AuthorDzongkha Development Commission
    Site nameDzongkha Development Commission
    Date2010-06-06
    LinkDzongkha tools for Unicode
  • Pages illustrating the Tibetan alphabet and the letter combinations used in forming words.

    AuthorChristopher J. Fynn
    Site nameChris Fynn
    Dateaccessed: 2011-10-26
    LinkElements of the Tibetan Writing System
  • This is a reading course and reference grammar designed to help students of Tibetan master not only the multiplicity of Tibetan grammatical markers and particles, but also to develop the skills to cope with the semantic component of Tibetan grammar. The book is not intended to be a textbook of spoken Tibetan, therefore instruction focuses on the written form of the language. Two chapters are devoted to presenting the letters of the alphabet with a description of how they are pronounced.

    AuthorMelvyn C. Goldstein
    PublisherUniversity of California Press
    LocationLos Angeles
    Year1991
  • An illustrated guide to writing the letters of the Tibetan script.

    AuthorChristopher J. Fynn
    Site nameChris Fynn
    Dateaccessed: 2011-10-26
    LinkHow to write the Tibetan script
    Abstract

    Basic Tibetan Calligraphy

  • Home page for Jomolhari - a Bhutanese style Tibetan script font.

    Jomolhari is a free, Unicode compatible, Tibetan script font named after Mt Jomolhari on the border of Bhutan & Tibet. The design of the font was inspired by Bhutanese manuscript examples and was originally designed for use in publishing traditional Buddhist texts. This font can be used for text in Tibetan, Dzongkha and other languages written in the Tibetan script.

    The Jomolhari font is freely available under the Open Font Licence

    In addition to Unicode character encoding, this font also supports GB/T20524-2006 encoded Tibetan text.

    AuthorChristopher J. Fynn
    Site nameChris Fynn
    Dateaccessed: 2011-10-25
    LinkJomolhari Font
  • This is a beginner's guide to reading, writing and pronouncing the letters of the Tibetan script. The author provides the disclaimer that (s)he is not a fluent Tibetan speaker but has drawn on various other sources to complie the information.

    Site namereocities
    DateAccessed 2011-08-22
    LinkLearn Tibetan
  • AuthorAndrew West
    Site nameBabelStone
    DateAccessed 5 October, 2010
    LinkNumbers that Don't Add Up
  • Detailed web page that describes changes in script and font support in versions of Windows from Windows 2000 through Windows 8 Consumer Preview. Notable changes in Windows 8 include support for Lisu, Myanmar and N'Ko scripts and increased support for advanced typographic capabilities such as stylistic sets and language-specific forms.

    Site nameMicrosoft Go Global Developer Center
    Date2012-03-01
    LinkScript & Font Support in Windows
  • Richard Ishida has created a chart to show which features (for example, combining characters, ligatures, case, baseline etc.) apply to a number of writing systems. The characteristics described are based on the exemplar character lists in the CLDR. The chart is intended to give a basic idea of which writing systems require what types of feature support.

    AuthorRichard Ishida
    Site namerishida.net
    Date2010-08-30
    LinkScript features by language
  • Richard Ishida has created a chart to show which features (for example, combining characters, ligatures, case, baseline etc.) apply to a number of writing systems. The characteristics described are based on the exemplar character lists in the CLDR. The chart is intended to give a basic idea of which writing systems require what types of feature support.

    AuthorRichard Ishida
    Site namerishida.net
    Date2010-08-30
    LinkScript features by language
  • A discussion of script choice among Tibetan-related languages.

    AuthorBradford Lynn Chamberlain
    JournalInternational Journal of the Sociology of Language
    Volume2008
    Issue192
    ISBN/ISSN1613-3668
    Pages117-131
    Linkhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1515/IJSL.2008.039
    Abstract

    Written development of Tibetan-related languages has seen an increase in recent years. When these languages are developed, the issue of script becomes very important. The Tibetan script has strong associations with the classical Tibetan language, and has been used primarily for writing Tibetan Buddhist religious works. As such, attitudes towards variation of its complex orthographic principles are quite conservative. In some regions (Tibet and Bhutan), the Tibetan orthography is clearly the preferable writing system for any written forms of these modern Tibetan languages.

    However, due to the conservative attitudes, adjusting the orthography to represent the reality of the modern languages can be a divisive exercise. In other regions where Tibetan-related languages are spoken (India, Nepal, and Pakistan), there are other scripts which may be considered in developing these modern Tibetan languages. Even in these situations the ethnolinguistic identity associated with the Tibetan script suggests that use of a modified Tibetan orthography is more acceptable than use of other scripts (though they may be more accessible). This article discusses some of the key issues involved in developing Tibetan languages in these multiscriptal environments, and gives examples from several such languages which are in varying stages of development.

  • AuthorHenry Rogers
    BookWriting Systems - A Linguistic Approach
    PublisherBlackwell
    LocationOxford, UK
    Year2005
    Pages223-226
  • Typepaper
    AuthorTony Duff
    InstitutionPadma Karpo Translation Committee
    Date2000
    LinkTibetan and Bhutanese Marks and Signs inclusion into Tibetan Unicode 3.0
  • This page lists characters in Unicode's Tibetan block and provides information about them.

    AuthorRichard Ishida
    Site namerishida.net
    Date2014-10-13
    Linkhttp://rishida.net/scripts/block/tibetan
  • Pickers allow you to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters arranged in a way that aids their identification. The phrase appears at the bottom of the screen and you can easily cut and paste the result into your own document. They're written in XHTML with a small amount of JavaScript.

    This picker includes all the characters in the Unicode Tibetan block as of Unicode 5.2.

    AuthorRichard Ishida
    Site nameIshida apps
    LinkTibetan character picker
  • The page contains brief notes on general script features. It looks at use of characters, and at text layout.

    AuthorRichard Ishida
    Site namerishida.net
    Date2014-10-18
    Linkhttp://rishida.net/scripts/tibetan/
  • A character picker is a tool that allows users to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters which have been arranged in a way that aids their identification. This is one such tool, which covers a number of scripts including Arabic, Bengali, Devanagari, Gurmukhi, Hebrew, Lao, Tamil, and Thai, amongst others. The user selects the required script from a panel on the right, and the characters for that script are presented to them, from which they can select the characters they need. As characters are selected, the phrase appears at the bottom of the screen and can be cut and pasted into other documents.
    Character pickers are likely to be most useful to those who don't know a script well enough to use the native keyboard. The arrangement of characters also makes it much more useable than a regular character map utility.

    AuthorRichard Ishida
    DateAccessed 2011-12-21
    LinkUnicode Character Pickers
  • The full text of the UDHR written in Tibetan, taken from the  Unicode UDHR site. Further information on UDHR materials for Tibetan may be available from the  United Nations Human Rights website.

Copyright © 2017 SIL International and released under the  Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license (CC-BY-SA) unless noted otherwise. Language data includes information from the  Ethnologue. Script information partially from the  ISO 15924 Registration Authority. Some character data from  The Unicode Standard Character Database and locale data from the  Common Locale Data Repository. Used by permission.