ScriptSource

Script

Tai VietTavt

Subject areas for this script

11

0

Blog posts in this subject area

These are posts from the blogs on this site; the full blogs can be accessed under the Topics link.

There are no blog posts for this subject.

0

Discussions in this subject area

Discussions include ideas, opinions or questions that invite comments from other ScriptSource users.

There are no discussions for this subject.

72 72

The following table shows which Unicode characters are uniquely associated with this script. A language which uses the script may use additional symbols not listed here. See individual writing system pages for complete listings.

Characters associated with this script

USV Graphic If these graphics are not displaying correctly, click for information. Character If these characters are not displaying correctly, click for information. Name
AA80 TAI VIET LETTER LOW KO
AA81 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH KO
AA82 TAI VIET LETTER LOW KHO
AA83 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH KHO
AA84 TAI VIET LETTER LOW KHHO
AA85 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH KHHO
AA86 TAI VIET LETTER LOW GO
AA87 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH GO
AA88 TAI VIET LETTER LOW NGO
AA89 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH NGO
AA8A TAI VIET LETTER LOW CO
AA8B TAI VIET LETTER HIGH CO
AA8C TAI VIET LETTER LOW CHO
AA8D TAI VIET LETTER HIGH CHO
AA8E TAI VIET LETTER LOW SO
AA8F TAI VIET LETTER HIGH SO
AA90 TAI VIET LETTER LOW NYO
AA91 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH NYO
AA92 TAI VIET LETTER LOW DO
AA93 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH DO
AA94 TAI VIET LETTER LOW TO
AA95 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH TO
AA96 TAI VIET LETTER LOW THO
AA97 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH THO
AA98 TAI VIET LETTER LOW NO
AA99 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH NO
AA9A TAI VIET LETTER LOW BO
AA9B TAI VIET LETTER HIGH BO
AA9C TAI VIET LETTER LOW PO
AA9D TAI VIET LETTER HIGH PO
AA9E TAI VIET LETTER LOW PHO
AA9F TAI VIET LETTER HIGH PHO
AAA0 TAI VIET LETTER LOW FO
AAA1 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH FO
AAA2 TAI VIET LETTER LOW MO
AAA3 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH MO
AAA4 TAI VIET LETTER LOW YO
AAA5 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH YO
AAA6 TAI VIET LETTER LOW RO
AAA7 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH RO
AAA8 TAI VIET LETTER LOW LO
AAA9 TAI VIET LETTER HIGH LO
AAAA TAI VIET LETTER LOW VO
AAAB TAI VIET LETTER HIGH VO
AAAC TAI VIET LETTER LOW HO
AAAD TAI VIET LETTER HIGH HO
AAAE TAI VIET LETTER LOW O
AAAF TAI VIET LETTER HIGH O
AAB0 TAI VIET MAI KANG
AAB1 TAI VIET VOWEL AA
AAB2 TAI VIET VOWEL I
AAB3 TAI VIET VOWEL UE
AAB4 TAI VIET VOWEL U
AAB5 TAI VIET VOWEL E
AAB6 TAI VIET VOWEL O
AAB7 TAI VIET MAI KHIT
AAB8 TAI VIET VOWEL IA
AAB9 TAI VIET VOWEL UEA
AABA TAI VIET VOWEL UA
AABB TAI VIET VOWEL AUE
AABC TAI VIET VOWEL AY
AABD TAI VIET VOWEL AN
AABE TAI VIET VOWEL AM
AABF ꪿ TAI VIET TONE MAI EK
AAC0 TAI VIET TONE MAI NUENG
AAC1 TAI VIET TONE MAI THO
AAC2 TAI VIET TONE MAI SONG
AADB TAI VIET SYMBOL KON
AADC TAI VIET SYMBOL NUENG
AADD TAI VIET SYMBOL SAM
AADE TAI VIET SYMBOL HO HOI
AADF TAI VIET SYMBOL KOI KOI

11
  • There are five non-alphabetic symbols:

    Two of the symbols, TAI VIET SYMBOL KON and TAI VIET SYMBOL NUENG, may be regarded as ligatures of the words meaning person and one, respectively. In the case of TAI VIET SYMBOL KON, the use or non-use of this symbol is used to distinguish between homophonous words.

    Source

    Jim Brase, 'Proposal to encode the Tai Viet script in the UCS', 2007 p. 9

    ContributorScriptSource Staff
  • The Tai Viet script uses Latin numerals. There is a non-alphabetic symbol, TAI VIET SYMBOL NUENG (below), which is used as an abbreviation for the word 'one'; however it is not used as a decimal digit.

    Source

    Jim Brase, 'Proposal to encode the Tai Viet script in the UCS', 2007 p. 9

    ContributorSteph Holloway
  • The Tai Viet script employs Latin punctuation as well as three non-alphabetic signs to indicate word repetition or a section break.

    ContributorScriptSource Staff
  • The term ‘reordering’ is difficult to define, partly because the concept can be approached from two different perspectives. The definition we use on ScriptSource is that a script is said to require reordering if the order in which some characters are written does not match the order in which they are pronounced. This definition approaches the concept of reordering from an orthographic perspective.

    To illustrate, the word below, written in the Devanagari script, is pronounced chinnu and means “to know” in the Nepali language.

    Notice that the order in which the characters are written in Devanagari does not reflect the order in which they are spoken. Specifically, the i is written before the ch, even though it is pronounced after it.

    An alternative way to approach the concept of reordering is from an encoding perspective. From this perspective, a script such as Devanagari is only said to require reordering if the characters are stored in memory in the order in which they are pronounced, but are reordered before rendering. So in the example above, the characters are stored as च + ि + न... (ch + i + n...), but before they are rendered on the screen they are reordered to ि + च + न... (i + ch + n...) to produce the correct spelling of the word. This system of encoding and storing the characters is called logical ordering.

    For the majority of scripts, the question of whether a script requires reordering is the same whichever you approach it from an orthographic or an encoding perspective. This is because, if a script requires orthographic reordering, like Devanagari, it is usually encoded in Unicode in logical order. So for the text to be correctly written or rendered, reordering is required both in the orthographic and in the encoding sense.

    However, there are a small number of scripts - Thai, Lao, and Tai Viet - which require orthographic reordering, but do not require reordering in the encoding sense. This is because these scripts are encoded in Unicode in visual order, not in logical order. So the characters are stored in memory in the order in which they appear on the page, and do not need to be reordered before they are rendered.

    For this reason, these three scripts include in their features table “Reordering: yes”, even though someone who defines the concept of reordering from an encoding perspective would disagree. These scripts do require orthographic reordering, but they are encoded in visual order, so they do not require reordering in the encoding sense.

    ContributorSteph Holloway
  • This document describes the process of reordering, an orthographic feature of many Asian scripts, using the example of the Tai Viet script. The document compares the oral and written syllable in Tai Viet.

    Source

    Jim Brase

    ContributorSteph Holloway on behalf of Jim Brase
  • This chart shows only the Tai Viet consonants which are encoded in Unicode 5.2.

    As well as the three pairs of letters here (in red) which are only used for writing Tai Don, an additional six Tai Don letters also exist, which are not encoded in Unicode.

    The two pairs of letters shown here in blue are only used for loan words. The phonemic value of these characters depends on the origin of the word.

    The Romanizations used in this chart are based on popular usage of the Vietnamese alphabet for writing the Tai languages.

    ContributorJim Brase
  • Only nine consonant sounds may occur in the syllable-final position. The final /k/ and final glottal stop /ʔ/ are written with the same symbol.

    ContributorJim Brase
  • Characters in Unicode are generally stored in logical order. That is to say, they are typed in the order in which they are spoken, and stored in the memory in the same order. In the case of Tai Viet script, characters are stored in visual order. This means that characters are generally typed in the order in which they appear on the page; a left-joining vowel is typed and stored in the memory before the consonant to which it is joined, despite being spoken after it. Visual storage order is deemed to produce a more usable computing solution for the Tai Viet script for the following reasons.

    Users of the Tai Viet script tend to view written language with a visual perspective and spoken language with a phonetic perspective. This means that established practice in handwriting is to write each letter in the order in which it appears. Left-joining vowels are written before the consonants to which they are joined. Equally, when spelling a word aloud, they describe a left-joining vowel before its consonant. In addition both the Lao script, which many Tai Viet users also read and type, and older encodings of the Tai Viet script, are stored in visual order, so this is the keyboarding order to which Tai Viet users are accustomed.

    There are several ambiguities in the script involving the interaction of labialized velar consonant digraphs with syllable boundaries and left-joining vowels (described in detail in Appendix 1 of the Unicode Proposal). Some of these ambiguities could be resolved by using logical order and introducing a virama, however it is expected that more serious problems would result.

    A visual order system is less complex than a logical order one, which would be difficult and expensive to maintain for the relatively small Tai user community.

    Source

    Based on Jim Brase, 'Proposal to encode the Tai Viet script in the UCS', 2007

    ContributorSteph Holloway
  • Tai Viet uses visual order - characters are entered and stroed in the order in which they appear on paper. The dotted circle is used here to represent the syllable's initial consonant, in order to show the correct data order and visual positioning of the vowels - the font should not reorder the data.

    The Tai Daeng vowel is quite different from the Tai Dam and Tai Don. In spoken form, the languages has length contrast on all vowels. No determination has been made as to how this is shown in writing.

    Tai Don vowels also include a final /-at/ ligature which is not encoded in Unicode, and not included in this chart..

    ContributorJim Brase
  • Like many other Tai scripts, the Tai Viet script contains a double set of initial consonants. These mark the tone class (high or low) of the following syllable. The high form of the consonant indicates tone 4, 5 or 6; the low form indicates tone 1, 2 or 3. Historically, this has been the only method of representing tone in the script. As checked syllables (those ending /p/, /t/, /k/, or /ʔ/) can only take tone 2 or tone 5, selecting the appropriate consonant form is sufficient for defining the tone of those syllables. The tone of unchecked syllables has traditionally been determined from the context.

    In recent years, additional means of tone marking have been introduced. Tai Dam speakers in the United States have adopted Lao tone marks, which are combining marks written above the initial consonant or above a combining vowel, as per the first table, below. These are used by the Song Petburi font and for SIL's Tai Heritage font.

    The Tai community in Vietnam write their own tone marks on the base line at the end of the syllable, as shown in the second table, above. Currently, both systems of tone marking are in use.

    Although the languages which use the Tai Viet script are overwhelmingly monosyllabic, a small number of words have two syllables, the first syllable being unstressed. In these words, tone is not marked on the unstressed syllable. Loan words may also have more than one syllable, and similarly do not mark tone.

    Source

    Jim Brase, 'Proposal to encode the Tai Viet script in the UCS', 2007 p. 7

    ContributorScriptSource Staff
  • In The Unicode Standard, Tai Viet script implementation is discussed in  Chapter 16 Southeast Asia.

    The Tai Viet script was encoded in The Unicode Standard version 5.2. The script is encoded in the following block:

    BlocksCharacter RangeAdded in Unicode VersionUnicode Chart
    Tai Viet AA80..AADF 5.2  UAA80.pdf

    A number of proposals for its inclusion have been submitted to the Unicode Technical Committee and WG2:

    2006-01-30 Unified Tai Script for Unicode — Ngo Trung Viet, Jim Brase ( L2/06-041)

    2007-01-03 Workshop on Encoding and Digitizing Thai Scripts — Jim Brase ( L2/07-008)

    2007-02-01 Comments on Viet Tay Proposal — Peter Constable ( L2/07-056)

    2007-02-06 Tay Viet Script for Unicode — Jim Brase ( L2/07-039)

    2007-03-20 Proposal to encode the Tai Viet script in the UCS — Jim Brase ( WG2 N3220,  L2/07-099)

    2007-03-21 Support for the proposal (N3220) to encode the Tai Viet script — Vũ Văn Điền (Vietnam N.B.) ( WG2 N3221.doc,  L2/07-100)

    2008-05-09 Writing Tai Don - Additional characters needed for the Tai Viet script — Jim Brase ( L2/08-217)

    2010-09-17 Proposal to change UAX#29 in response to Thai, Lao, Tai Dam user needs — Martin Hosken ( L2/10-460)

    2011-04-18 Proposal to change grapheme extending properties of various characters — Martin Hosken ( L2/11-114)

    ContributorScriptSource Staff

0

0

Copyright © 2017 SIL International and released under the  Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license (CC-BY-SA) unless noted otherwise. Language data includes information from the  Ethnologue. Script information partially from the  ISO 15924 Registration Authority. Some character data from  The Unicode Standard Character Database and locale data from the  Common Locale Data Repository. Used by permission.