ScriptSource

Script

ThaiThai

Subject areas for this script

6

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Title
Reordering and Data Storage Order
Thai Consonants
Thai Diacritics
Thai Vowels
Unicode Status (Currency)
Unicode Status (Thai)

0

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86 86

The following table shows which Unicode characters are uniquely associated with this script. A language which uses the script may use additional symbols not listed here. See individual writing system pages for complete listings.

Characters associated with this script

USV Graphic If these graphics are not displaying correctly, click for information. Character If these characters are not displaying correctly, click for information. Name
0E01 THAI CHARACTER KO KAI
0E02 THAI CHARACTER KHO KHAI
0E03 THAI CHARACTER KHO KHUAT
0E04 THAI CHARACTER KHO KHWAI
0E05 THAI CHARACTER KHO KHON
0E06 THAI CHARACTER KHO RAKHANG
0E07 THAI CHARACTER NGO NGU
0E08 THAI CHARACTER CHO CHAN
0E09 THAI CHARACTER CHO CHING
0E0A THAI CHARACTER CHO CHANG
0E0B THAI CHARACTER SO SO
0E0C THAI CHARACTER CHO CHOE
0E0D THAI CHARACTER YO YING
0E0E THAI CHARACTER DO CHADA
0E0F THAI CHARACTER TO PATAK
0E10 THAI CHARACTER THO THAN
0E11 THAI CHARACTER THO NANGMONTHO
0E12 THAI CHARACTER THO PHUTHAO
0E13 THAI CHARACTER NO NEN
0E14 THAI CHARACTER DO DEK
0E15 THAI CHARACTER TO TAO
0E16 THAI CHARACTER THO THUNG
0E17 THAI CHARACTER THO THAHAN
0E18 THAI CHARACTER THO THONG
0E19 THAI CHARACTER NO NU
0E1A THAI CHARACTER BO BAIMAI
0E1B THAI CHARACTER PO PLA
0E1C THAI CHARACTER PHO PHUNG
0E1D THAI CHARACTER FO FA
0E1E THAI CHARACTER PHO PHAN
0E1F THAI CHARACTER FO FAN
0E20 THAI CHARACTER PHO SAMPHAO
0E21 THAI CHARACTER MO MA
0E22 THAI CHARACTER YO YAK
0E23 THAI CHARACTER RO RUA
0E24 THAI CHARACTER RU
0E25 THAI CHARACTER LO LING
0E26 THAI CHARACTER LU
0E27 THAI CHARACTER WO WAEN
0E28 THAI CHARACTER SO SALA
0E29 THAI CHARACTER SO RUSI
0E2A THAI CHARACTER SO SUA
0E2B THAI CHARACTER HO HIP
0E2C THAI CHARACTER LO CHULA
0E2D THAI CHARACTER O ANG
0E2E THAI CHARACTER HO NOKHUK
0E2F THAI CHARACTER PAIYANNOI
0E30 THAI CHARACTER SARA A
0E31 THAI CHARACTER MAI HAN-AKAT
0E32 THAI CHARACTER SARA AA
0E33 THAI CHARACTER SARA AM
0E34 THAI CHARACTER SARA I
0E35 THAI CHARACTER SARA II
0E36 THAI CHARACTER SARA UE
0E37 THAI CHARACTER SARA UEE
0E38 THAI CHARACTER SARA U
0E39 THAI CHARACTER SARA UU
0E3A THAI CHARACTER PHINTHU
0E40 THAI CHARACTER SARA E
0E41 THAI CHARACTER SARA AE
0E42 THAI CHARACTER SARA O
0E43 THAI CHARACTER SARA AI MAIMUAN
0E44 THAI CHARACTER SARA AI MAIMALAI
0E45 THAI CHARACTER LAKKHANGYAO
0E46 THAI CHARACTER MAIYAMOK
0E47 THAI CHARACTER MAITAIKHU
0E48 THAI CHARACTER MAI EK
0E49 THAI CHARACTER MAI THO
0E4A THAI CHARACTER MAI TRI
0E4B THAI CHARACTER MAI CHATTAWA
0E4C THAI CHARACTER THANTHAKHAT
0E4D THAI CHARACTER NIKHAHIT
0E4E THAI CHARACTER YAMAKKAN
0E4F THAI CHARACTER FONGMAN
0E50 THAI DIGIT ZERO
0E51 THAI DIGIT ONE
0E52 THAI DIGIT TWO
0E53 THAI DIGIT THREE
0E54 THAI DIGIT FOUR
0E55 THAI DIGIT FIVE
0E56 THAI DIGIT SIX
0E57 THAI DIGIT SEVEN
0E58 THAI DIGIT EIGHT
0E59 THAI DIGIT NINE
0E5A THAI CHARACTER ANGKHANKHU
0E5B THAI CHARACTER KHOMUT

6
  • The term ‘reordering’ is difficult to define, partly because the concept can be approached from two different perspectives. The definition we use on ScriptSource is that a script is said to require reordering if the order in which some characters are written does not match the order in which they are pronounced. This definition approaches the concept of reordering from an orthographic perspective.

    To illustrate, the word below, written in the Devanagari script, is pronounced chinnu and means “to know” in the Nepali language.

    Notice that the order in which the characters are written in Devanagari does not reflect the order in which they are spoken. Specifically, the i is written before the ch, even though it is pronounced after it.

    An alternative way to approach the concept of reordering is from an encoding perspective. From this perspective, a script such as Devanagari is only said to require reordering if the characters are stored in memory in the order in which they are pronounced, but are reordered before rendering. So in the example above, the characters are stored as च + ि + न... (ch + i + n...), but before they are rendered on the screen they are reordered to ि + च + न... (i + ch + n...) to produce the correct spelling of the word. This system of encoding and storing the characters is called logical ordering.

    For the majority of scripts, the question of whether a script requires reordering is the same whichever you approach it from an orthographic or an encoding perspective. This is because, if a script requires orthographic reordering, like Devanagari, it is usually encoded in Unicode in logical order. So for the text to be correctly written or rendered, reordering is required both in the orthographic and in the encoding sense.

    However, there are a small number of scripts - Thai, Lao, and Tai Viet - which require orthographic reordering, but do not require reordering in the encoding sense. This is because these scripts are encoded in Unicode in visual order, not in logical order. So the characters are stored in memory in the order in which they appear on the page, and do not need to be reordered before they are rendered.

    For this reason, these three scripts include in their features table “Reordering: yes”, even though someone who defines the concept of reordering from an encoding perspective would disagree. These scripts do require orthographic reordering, but they are encoded in visual order, so they do not require reordering in the encoding sense.

    ContributorSteph Holloway
  • Pronunciation of a consonant letter is determined by its position in a word. For example, the letter called so so is pronounced [s] at the start of a syllable, but [t] at the end. Only [p], [t], [k] and the nasals [n], [m], [ŋ] can occur syllable-finally, with the result that each of these sounds can be represented by a number of letters in the syllable-final position. One letter represents different sounds in different contexts. The prescribed pronunciation is [r], but in colloquial speech it is often pronounced [l]. The pronunciation of this letter can be a useful sociolinguistic indicator.

    Consonants are divided into three classes. There are five tones in the Thai language; tone is indicated by a combination of consonant class, the degree to which the syllable is open or closed, vowel length, and whether or not the syllable bears one of four tone markers. A chart to illustrate the tone marking system can be found at  thaitranslate.com. There is some flexibility in the pronunciation of tones; in informal speech, tones are not always pronounced as they are traditionally written, however in formal speech or recitations pronunciation follows the written form.

    Consonant letters cannot be conjoined to form ligatures, but a virama symbol called pinthu is used to mute the inherent vowel and enable consonant clusters to be written.

    Consonants are ordered according to place of articulation, roughly with those articulated furthest back in the oral cavity coming first and those articulated furthest forward coming near the end. Sibilants and liquids are ordered at the end.

    ContributorScriptSource Staff
  • Diacritics are used with the Thai alphabet to indicate modifications of the values of the letters.

    Thai is a tonal language, and the script gives full information on the tones. Tones are realised in the vowels, but indicated in the script by a combination of the class of the initial consonant (high, mid or low), vowel length (long or short), closing consonant (unvoiced-plosive or voiced-sonorant) and, if present, one of four tone marks. The names and signs of the tone marks are derived from the numbers one, two, three and four in an Indic language.

    Two consonant characters (not diacritics) are used to modify the tone:

    ห นำ ho nam, leading ho. A silent, high-class ห "leads" low-class nasal consonants (ง, ญ, น and ม) and non-plosives (ว, ย, ร and ล), which have no corresponding high-class phonetic match, into the tone properties of a high-class consonant. In polysyllabic words, an initial mid- or high-class consonant with an implicit vowel similarly "leads" these same low-class consonants into the higher class tone rules, with the tone marker borne by the low-class consonant.

    อ นำ o nam, leading o. In four words only, a silent, mid-class อ "leads" low-class ย into mid-class tone rules: อย่า (ya, don't) อยาก (yak, desire) อย่าง (yang, yet) อยู่ (yu, stay). Note all four have long-vowel, low-tone siang ek, but อยาก, a dead syllable, needs no tone marker, but the three live syllables all take mai ek.

    Exceptions where words are spelled with one tone but pronounced with another often occur in informal conversation (notably the pronouns ฉัน chan and เขา khao, which are both pronounced with a high tone rather than the rising tone indicated by the script). Generally, when such words are recited or read in public, they are pronounced as spelled.

    Other diacritics are used to indicate short vowels and silent consonants:

    –็ Mai taikhu (to indicate short vowels) means "stick that climbs and squats". It is a miniature Thai numeral 8 ๘. Mai taikhu is often used with sara e (เ) and sara ae (แ) in closed syllables.

    –์ Thanthakhat (to indicate silent consonants) means "killing as punishment"; also called karan, meaning "canceled".

    Source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thai_script#Diacritics
    CopyrightNot indicated
    LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Allows modification and redistribution
    ContributorScriptSource Staff
  • Like many Indic scripts, Thai assigns an inherent vowel to each consonant. The pronunciation of the inherent vowel is determined by its position in the word. In an open syllable, the inherent vowel is [a], but in a closed syllable (where the vowel sound is followed by another consonant) it is [o]. The inherent vowel can be modified by means of dependent vowel signs. Long vowels are indicated by a vowel sign above, below or alongside the consonant. Short vowels are represented either by adding a final "short" marker to the long vowel sign, or with their own unique symbol.

    Vowels are always written dependently; there is an orthographic rule in Thai that all syllables must begin with a consonant letter. However, spoken Thai does allow syllables to start with a vowel. To allow representation of this, a zero consonant, transcribed in the IPA as a glottal stop, is written as the first letter in a (phonetically) vowel-initial syllable.

    ContributorScriptSource Staff
  • In The Unicode Standard, Currency symbols are discussed in  Chapter 22 Symbols. Currency symbols generally have an inherited script property rather than a specific script property.

    The Currency Symbols block was first encoded in The Unicode Standard version 1.1. Since that time the encoding has undergone a number of modifications; the symbols are now encoded in the following blocks:

    BlocksCharacter RangeAdded in Unicode VersionUnicode Charts
    C0 Controls and Basic Latin 0024 1.1  U0000
    C1 Controls and Latin-1 Supplement 00A2..00A5 1.1  U0080
    Latin Extended-B 0192 1.1  U0180
    Arabic 060B 4.1  U0600
    Bengali 09F2..09F3 1.1  U0980
    Gujarati 0AF1 4.0  U0A80
    Tamil 0BF9 4.0  U0B80
    Thai 0E3F 1.1  U0E00
    Khmer 17DB 3.0  U1780
    Currency Symbols 20A0..20CF 1.1  U20A0
    Letterlike Symbols 2133 1.1  U2100
    CJK Unified Ideographs 5143, 5186, 5706, 5713 1.1  U4E00
    Arabic Presentation Forms-A FDFC 3.2  UFB50
    Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms FF04, FFE0, FFE1, FFE5, FFE6 1.1  UFF00

    Subsequent to version 1.1, the following Currency characters have been added:

    CharactersUnicode VersionDocumentation
    058F 6.1  WG2 N3771,  L2/10-008
    060B 4.1  WG2 N2640,  L2/03-330
    09FB 5.2  WG2 N3311,  L2/07-192,  L2/08-288
    0AF1 4.0  L2/09-331
    0BF9 4.0  
    17DB 3.0  
    20AB 2.0  
    20AC 2.1  WG2 N1566.html, L2/97-081 (not online)
    20AD 3.0  WG2 N1720.doc,  WG2 N1720,  L2/98-061
    20AE 3.0 WG2 N1857 (not online), L2/98-360 (not online)
    20AF 3.0  WG2 N1946,  WG2 N1946_drachma,  L2/99-025,  WG2 N3866,  L2/10-253
    20B0 3.2  WG2 N2188, L2/98-309 (not available online),  L2/00-092
    20B1 3.2  WG2 N2040.doc,  WG2 N2156.doc,  L2/00-013,  WG2 N2161.doc,  L2/00-053
    20B2..20B3 4.1  WG2 N2579,  L2/03-095
    20B4..20B5 4.1  WG2 N2743,  L2/04-139
    20B6 5.2  WG2 N3387,  L2/07-332
    20B7 5.2  WG2 N3390,  L2/08-115
    20B8 5.2  WG2 N3392,  L2/08-116
    20B9 6.0  L2/10-051,  L2/10-251,  WG2 N3862,  L2/10-249,  WG2 N3887,  L2/10-258
    20BA 6.2  WG2 N4258,  L2/12-117,  WG2 N4273,  L2/12-132
    20BB 7.0  WG2 N4308,  L2/12-242
    20BC 7.0  L2/11-231,  L2/11-366,  WG2 N4163,  L2/11-420,  WG2 N4168,  L2/12-047,  WG2 N4445,  L2/13-180
    20BD 7.0  WG2 N4512,  L2/13-235,  WG2 N4529,  L2/14-039
    20BE 8.0  WG2 N4593,  L2/14-161,  L2/15-168
    20BF 10.0  L2/11-129,  L2/15-229
    A838 5.2  WG2 N3334,  L2/07-238,  WG2 N3367,  L2/07-354,  L2/07-390
    FDFC 3.2 WG2 N1856 (not online), L2/98-359 (not online),  WG2 N2373,  L2/01-354

    Documentation refers to  ISO Working Group and Unicode proposals

    A number of proposals for its inclusion have been submitted to the Unicode Technical Committee and WG2:

    1997-06-23 Proposal for addition of a new character: EURO SIGN — National bodies of Canada, Finland, Iceland, US, the Unicode Consortium and V.S. Umamaheswaran (expert) ( WG2 N1566.html, L2/97-081 (not online))

    1998-02-27 KIP SIGN - Laotian Currency Sign — V.S. Umamaheswaran ( WG2 N1720.doc,  WG2 N1720,  L2/98-061)

    1998-09-10 Proposal to encode the "German Penny Symbol" — Elmar Dünßer ( WG2 N2188, L2/98-309 (not available online))

    1998-09 Addition of the RIAL sign on ISO 10646 — Japan (WG2 N1856 (not online), L2/98-359 (not online))

    1998-09 Addition of Tugrik sign on ISO 10646 — Japan (WG2 N1857 (not online), L2/98-360 (not online)

    1998-09 Addition of Peso sign on ISO 10646 — Japan (WG2 N1858 (not online), L2/98-361 (not online)

    1999-01-20 Addition of the DRACHMA SIGN to the UCS — ELOT / Everson ( WG2 N1946,  WG2 N1946_drachma,  L2/99-025)

    1999-06-10 Peso sign — Philippines and Japan ( WG2 N2040.doc)

    2000-01-06 Peso sign and Peseta sign (U-20A7) — Takayuki K. Sato ( WG2 N2156.doc,  L2/00-013)

    2000-02-20 Peso -Character sample — Takayuki K. Sato ( WG2 N2161.doc,  L2/00-053)

    2000-03-14 Proposal to add German Penny Symbol — The Unicode Consortium ( L2/00-092)

    2001-09-20 Proposal to add Arabic Currency Sign Rial to the UCS — Roozbeh Pournader ( WG2 N2373,  L2/01-354)

    2003-02-24 Proposal to encode the GUARANI SIGN and the AUSTRAL SIGN in the UCS — Michael Everson ( WG2 N2579,  L2/03-095)

    2003-10-01 Revised proposal to encode the AFGHANI SIGN in the UCS — Michael Everson, Roozbeh Pournader ( WG2 N2640,  L2/03-330)

    2004-04-23 Proposal to encode the HRYVNIA SIGN and the CEDI SIGN in the UCS — Michael Everson ( WG2 N2743,  L2/04-139)

    2004-05-18 Encoding of Devanagari Rupee Sign in Devanagari code block — Gov't of India ( L2/04-236)

    2004-05-19 Proposal of Myanmar Currency Sign — Myanmar N B ( WG2 N2769,  L2/04-199)

    2007-07-31 Towards an Encoding for North Indic Number Forms in the UCS — Anshuman Pandey ( WG2 N3334,  L2/07-238)

    2007-09-24 Proposal to encode the Livre Tournois sign in the UCS — David R. Sewell ( WG2 N3387,  L2/07-332)

    2007-10-07 Proposal to Encode North Indic Number Forms in ISO/IEC 10646 — Anshuman Pandey ( WG2 N3367,  L2/07-354)

    2007-10-08 Proposal to Encode the Ganda Currency Mark for Bengali in ISO/IEC 10646 — Anshuman Pandey ( WG2 N3311,  L2/07-192)

    2007-10-14 Changes in L2/07-354 North Indic Number Forms (vs. L2/07-139) — Deborah Anderson ( L2/07-390)

    2008-03-06 Proposal to encode the Esperanto spesmilo sign in the UCS — Michael Everson ( WG2 N3390,  L2/08-115)

    2008-03-06 Proposal to encode the Kazakh tenge sign in the UCS — Michael Everson ( WG2 N3392,  L2/08-116)

    2008-08-04 Public Review Issue #123: Bengali Currency Numerator Values — Ken Whistler ( L2/08-288)

    2009-04-06 Proposal to encode a Florin currency symbol — German N.B. ( WG2 N3588,  L2/09-113)

    2009-10-07 Proposal to Deprecate GUJARATI RUPEE SIGN — Anshuman Pandey ( L2/09-331)

    2010-01-29 Govt. of India’s inputs on document no. L2/10-029 — Swaran Lata ( L2/10-051)

    2010-02-10 Proposal to encode an Armenian Dram currency symbol — Karl Pentzlin ( WG2 N3771,  L2/10-008)

    2010-05-03 Additional notes on the Florin symbol — Karl Pentzlin ( L2/10-163)

    2010-07-16 Proposal to Encode India’s National Currency Symbol — Rabin Deka ( L2/10-251)

    2010-07-19 Proposal to encode the INDIAN RUPEE SIGN in the UCS — Michael Everson ( WG2 N3862,  L2/10-249)

    2010-07-19 Proposal to change the glyph of the DRACHMA SIGN — Michael Everson ( WG2 N3866,  L2/10-253)

    2010-08-04 How to Pick a Representative Glyph for a New Currency Symbol — Ken Whistler, Asmus Freytag ( L2/10-289)

    2010-08-09 Comment on L2/10-230, Proposal to encode a modifier letter used in French abbreviations in the UCS — Eric Muller ( L2/10-315)

    2010-09-01 Proposal to encode the Indian Rupee Symbol in the UCS — Gov't of India / Swaran Lata ( WG2 N3887,  L2/10-258)

    2011-03-24 Addition of Bitcoin Sign — Sander van Geloven ( L2/11-129)

    2011-08-05 Revised Proposal to encode Azerbaijani manat sign in the UCS (minor update) — Mykyta Yevstifeyev ( L2/11-231)

    2011-10-18 Proposal to encode historic currency signs of Russia in the UCS — Yuri Kalashnov, Ilya Yevlampiev, Karl Pentzlin, Roman Doroshenko ( WG2 N4208,  L2/11-273)

    2011-10-21 Additional evidence for the Azerbaijan Manat symbol — Karl Pentzlin ( L2/11-366)

    2011-10-31 Letter from Central Bank of Azerbaijan Regarding Manat Sign — Karl Pentzlin ( WG2 N4163,  L2/11-420)

    2011-11-10 Proposal to add the currency sign for the Azerbaijani Manat to the UCS — German N.B. ( WG2 N4168,  L2/12-047)

    2012-04-17 Proposal to encode the Turkish Lira Sign in the UCS — Michael Everson ( WG2 N4258,  L2/12-117)

    2012-04-24 Feedback on Early Russian Currency Symbols (L2/11-273=N4208) — Ralph Cleminson, David Birnbaum ( L2/12-148)

    2012-04-27 Proposal to Encode the Turkish Lira Symbol in the UCS — N. Sacit Uluirmak ( WG2 N4273,  L2/12-132)

    2012-05-06 Notes on the feedback document L2/12-148 regarding Early Russian Currency Symbols (L2/11-273 = WG2 N4208) by Ralph Cleminson and David Birnbaum (dated 2012-04-24) — Karl Pentzlin ( L2/12-183)

    2012-07-24 Proposal for one historic currency character, MARK SIGN — Nina Marie Evensen, Deborah Anderson ( WG2 N4308,  L2/12-242)

    2012-10-29 Default property values for unassigned code points in the Currency Symbols block — Laurentiu Iancu ( L2/12-345)

    2013-06-10 Proposal to add the currency sign for the Azerbaijani Manat to the UCS — Karl Pentzlin ( WG2 N4445,  L2/13-180)

    2014-02-04 Proposal to encode the RUBLE SIGN in the UCS — Michael Everson ( WG2 N4512,  L2/13-235)

    2014-02-11 Proposal to add the currency sign for the RUSSIAN RUBLE to the UCS — Russian NB ( WG2 N4529,  L2/14-039)

    2014-08-14 Adding Georgian Lari currency sign — George Melashvili ( WG2 N4593,  L2/14-161)

    2014-07-28 Recommendations to UTC #140 August 2014 on Script Proposals — Deborah Anderson, Ken Whistler, Rick McGowan, Roozbeh Pournader, Laurentiu Iancu ( L2/14-170)

    2015-07-06 The Lari Symbol: Implementation Principles and Supplementary Manual — National Bank of Georgia / Giorgi Shermazanashvili ( L2/15-168)

    2015-10-02 Proposal for addition of bitcoin sign — Ken Shirriff ( L2/15-229)

    UTC #145 Minutes ( L2/15-254) (See E.2 for decision and action items)

    2017-01-31 Proposal to encode Iranian Currency Sign TOMAN to the UCS — Toman O Rial ( L2/17-060)

    Recommendations to UTC #151 May 2017 on Script Proposals ( L2/17-153) (See point 18.)

    UTC #151 Minutes ( L2/17-103) (See E.7 for decision and action items)

    ContributorLorna Evans
  • In The Unicode Standard, Thai script implementation is discussed in  Chapter 16 Southeast Asia.

    The Thai script was encoded in The Unicode Standard version 1.0. The script is encoded in the following block:

    BlocksCharacter RangeAdded in Unicode VersionUnicode Chart
    Thai 0E00..0E7F 1.0  U0E00.pdf

    A number of proposals for its inclusion have been submitted to the Unicode Technical Committee and WG2:

    1999-04-29 ISO/IEC 14651 (informative annex) Thai String Collation — Theppitak Karoonboonyanan ( L2/99-136)

    2001-03-16 N2332 - Thai Character Names in FDIS 8859-11 — Surayuth Boonmatat ( WG2 N2332,  L2/01-122)

    2001-03-16 Change of Thai Names requested (8859-11) — Michael Everson ( L2/01-120)

    2001-03-16 FDIS 8859-11 – Thai — Johan van Wingen ( L2/01-121)

    2001-07-02 Revised Text of FCD 8859-11, Information technology — 8-bit single-byte coded graphic character sets — Part 11: Latin/Thai alphabet — Johan van Wingen, Surayuth Boonmatat ( L2/01-289)

    2002-01-14 Character Properties for avagrahas, etc. — Kenneth Whistler ( L2/02-017)

    2002-01-14 Character Properties for repetition marks — Kenneth Whistler ( L2/02-016)

    2003-06-12 Thai and Lao collation weighting rules — Kent Karlsson ( L2/03-185)

    2004-03-09 Ordering rules for Khmer, Thai, and Lao; CTT suggestion — Kent Karlsson ( WG2 N2717.doc,  L2/04-110)

    2004-03-09 Ordering rules for Khmer, Thai, and Lao; suggestions for annex C.2 changes and a new annex B.5 — Kent Karlsson ( WG2 N2718.doc,  L2/04-111)

    2004-07-18 Two problems in Thai rendering — Eric Muller ( L2/04-332)

    2006-03-06 Thai collation errors — James Clark ( L2/06-082)

    2006-07-27 Re: document Sk vs Lm vs — Martin Hosken ( L2/06-243)

    2009-08-03 Grapheme break changes, especially for Thai and Lao — Peter Edberg ( L2/09-265)

    2010-09-17 Proposal to change UAX#29 in response to Thai, Lao, Tai Dam user needs — Martin Hosken ( L2/10-460)

    2010-11-01 Proposal not to encode 4 minority Thai letters for Patani Malay — Martin Hosken ( L2/10-451)

    2011-02-03 Response to UTC Suggestions Regarding Thai in UAX#29 — Martin Hosken ( L2/11-051)

    2011-04-18 Proposal to change grapheme extending properties of various characters — Martin Hosken ( L2/11-114)

    2012-01-26 Grapheme-break related properties for U+0E2F THAI CHARACTER PAIYANNOI' — Nattapong Siralappanich, V S Umamaheswaran ( L2/12-038)

    ContributorScriptSource Staff

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